Traveller’s Diary Part #5: Glühwein, traditional Christmas drink for German speaking countries

Glühwein, a type of mulled wine is generally made with red wine heated with various mulling spices. It is the traditional Christmas drink in European countries and more popular in German speaking countries. Step out in the market during the Christmas time and the aroma of the spiced wine will definitely draw you towards one of the many pop up Glühwein stalls. The existence of Glühwein dates back to 2nd century and Romans were the first ones who said to have mulled their wines.

Our fellow traveller, Diksha Sahni who is a Christmas lover shares her experience of being in Germany during Christmas and enjoying a hot cuppa of Glühwein in a traditional Christmas market..

Gluhwein Christmas Drink
Gluhwein, The Traditional Christmas Drink

 

“I find the Christmas time to be the most magical time of the year. No matter how old I get, I am always in awe as the Christmas countdown begins and the magic of Christmas fills the air. And if you are in Germany ahead of Christmas, you are likely to be left enchanted by the festive atmosphere. A big part of tradition of Christmas in Germany are the German Christmas markets, held in various towns and cities across the country.

When you talk about the German Christmas markets, an intrinsic part of the festive tradition is a cup of Glühwein (hot mulled wine). The heady aromas hit you as soon as you take your first steps towards the Christmas market stalls. Hints of cinnamon, nutmeg, orange, lemon, red wine and brandy all combine in perfect proportions to make this quintessential festive winter drink. Although the recipe is a standard, there are variations available at each stall, probably familial secrets passed down generations!
When the weather gets chilly enough to make your bones cold, you know a hot mulled wine is what you need to warm you! At the Nürnberg Christmas market, you will find the red mulled wine being served in a souvenir cup, that is especially designed each year, but remember to take it slow, as a hot wine with all the sugar will hit you faster than a regular glass! The fun of Christmas market isn’t over yet! For those who don’t take alcohol, there is a non-alcoholic version called the “Kinderpunsch”, usually made from apple or grape juice.”
Diksha SahniDiksha Sahni is a communications professional based out of Bangalore and calls Delhi her home. Having lived in Germany and Manchester for some years, she has left her pieces of heart in Europe. She feeds her soul on Bollywood films and dance, traveling, and generous servings of pizza. 
News Reporter

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